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THE VELDT (Ray Bradbury Collection) by Ray Bradbury


THE VELDT (Ray Bradbury Collection) by Ray Bradbury (hier online bestellen)


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The story:
The story of "The Veldt", is delving into the issue of how modern technology can destroy the nuclear family. The story begins with the mother of the family, who has quite a generic name. no information is provided of the characters' background and how they came to the point in time they are now. The lines "Happylife Home" and the familiar room settings like the parents' bedroom and the nursery gives one a sense that this is a typical suburban home of the time. The mother seems alarmed or confused about something, "the nursery is...different now than it was", this at first might lead you to believe the mother has true individual characteristics. However, when one reads on, one sees the stereotyped reactions to every situation that comes about, the parents then say "nothing's too good for our children".
Later in the story the parents discuss the problems of the incredible house and nursery, "The house is wife, mother, and nursemaid, Can I compete with it?", and the father has a generic answer "But I thought that's why we bought this house". The parents in the story look upon their children's needs as services instead of ways of expressing any love or care.
In the story we never learn anything about the children except for their obsession with the nursery, "I don't want to do anything but look and listen and smell; what else is there to do?". When the parents tell the children the idea of shutting down the computerized house "for a vacation", the children react in shock and stay with their one, single characteristic given, they act shocked "Who will fry my eggs for me, or darn my socks?". One then sees the children's primary relationship is to the house and not the parents, the children exclaim "I wish you were dead!". And sure enough, by the end of the story the children act on their characteristic own. .

Extract from book:
"George, I wish you'd look at the nursery."
"What's wrong with it?"
"I don't know."
"Well, then."
"I just want you to look at it, is all, or call a psychologist in to look at it."
"What would a psychologist want with a nursery?"
"You know very well what he'd want." His wife paused in the middle of the kitchen and watched the stove busy humming to itself, making supper for four.
"It's just that the nursery is different now than it was."
"All right, let's have a look."
They walked down the hall of their soundproofed Happylife Home, which had cost them thirty thousand dollars installed, this house which clothed and fed and rocked them to sleep and played and sang and was good to them. Their approach sensitized a switch somewhere and the nursery light flicked on when they came within ten feet of it. Similarly, behind them, in the halls, lights went on and off as they left them behind, with a soft automaticity.
"Well," said George Hadley.

They stood on the thatched floor of the nursery. It was forty feet across by forty feet long and thirty feet high; it had cost half again as much as the rest of the house. "But nothing's too good for our children," George had said.
The nursery was silent. It was empty as a jungle glade at hot high noon. The walls were blank and two dimensional. Now, as George and Lydia Hadley stood in the center of the room, the walls began to purr and recede into crystalline distance, it seemed, and presently an African veldt appeared, in three dimensions, on all sides, in color reproduced to the final pebble and bit of straw. The ceiling above them became a deep sky with a hot yellow sun.
George Hadley felt the perspiration start on his brow.
"Let's get out of this sun," he said. "This is a little too real. But I don't see anything wrong."
"Wait a moment, you'll see," said his wife.
Now the hidden odorophonics were beginning to blow a wind of odor at the two people in the middle of the baked veldtland. The hot straw smell of lion grass, the cool green smell of the hidden water hole, the great rusty smell of animals, the smell of dust like a red paprika in the hot air. And now the sounds: the thump of distant antelope feet on grassy sod, the papery rustling of vultures. A shadow passed through the sky. The shadow flickered on George Hadley's upturned, sweating face.
"Filthy creatures," he heard his wife say.
"The vultures."



About the author:
Ray Bradbury, American novelist, short story writer, essayist, playwright, screenwriter and poet, was born August 22, 1920 in Waukegan, Illinois. He graduated from a Los Angeles high school in 1938. Although his formal education ended there, he became a "student of life," selling newspapers on L.A. street corners from 1938 to 1942, spending his nights in the public library and his days at the typewriter. He became a full-time writer in 1943, and contributed numerous short stories to periodicals before publishing a collection of them, Dark Carnival, in 1947.
His reputation as a writer of courage and vision was established with the publication of The Martian Chronicles in 1950, which describes the first attempts of Earth people to conquer and colonize Mars, and the unintended consequences. Next came The Illustrated Man and then, in 1953, Fahrenheit 451, which many consider to be Bradbury's masterpiece, a scathing indictment of censorship set in a future world where the written word is forbidden. In an attempt to salvage their history and culture, a group of rebels memorize entire works of literature and philosophy as their books are burned by the totalitarian state. Other works include The October Country, Dandelion Wine, A Medicine for Melancholy, Something Wicked This Way Comes, I Sing the Body Electric!, Quicker Than the Eye, and Driving Blind. In all, Bradbury has published more than thirty books, close to 600 short stories, and numerous poems, essays, and plays. His short stories have appeared in more than 1,000 school curriculum "recommended reading" anthologies. Mr. Bradbury's eagerly awaited new novel, From the Dust Returned, will be published by William Morrow at Halloween 2001. Morrow will release One More For the Road, a new collection Bradbury stories, at Christmas 2001.
Married since 1947, Mr. Bradbury and his wife Maggie live in Los Angeles with their four beloved cats. They have four daughters and eight grandchildren. Sadly, Maggie passed away in November of 2003.


Buchdaten:
THE VELDT (Ray Bradbury Collection) by Ray Bradbury
Sprache: Englisch
Taschenbuch - 128 Seiten - Creative Education, Incorporated
Erscheinungsdatum: Februar 1993
ISBN: 0886821088
Preis: € ???



More works from the same author:

hier online bestellen

Fahrenheit 451
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Let's All Kill
Constance
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The Illustrated Man
hier online bestellen

Switch on the Night
hier online bestellen

The October Country


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